Triumph is going electric.

An increasing number of manufacturers are announcing a series of electrification measures, unveiling concepts, and taking this whole battery thing a lot more seriously than they did five years ago. One of the brands that’s been banking on its history and vintage image the most has finally announced a partnership with important UK electric mobility players. Yep, Triumph is going electric!

The company announced earlier on Wednesday that it will be teaming up with such important innovators as Williams Advanced Engineering (a branch of the Williams Group, behind the Formula 1 team), Integral Powertrain, and the University of Warwick. The goal: press the fast-forward button on Triumph’s electrification.

The plan is ambitious: project TE-1 aims at accelerating the development of an electric powertrain at Triumph’s on a timeline of only two years. The brand will steer the design and platform development while the partners will contribute their technological expertise: Williams will work on the batteries, Integral Powertrain of the electric motor and the University of Warwick will take care of all the research.  

While this all might seem sudden and even potentially rushed, the motorcycle manufacturer guarantees that the goal isn’t to take the easy path by ending up with an underwhelming or overpriced product. The electric Triumph will be built on the same standards of quality and usability as the gasoline models; it will all come down to the clients’ preference with no other difference than the powertrain.

“Project Triumph TE-1 is one part of our electric motorcycle strategy, focused on delivering what riders want and expect from their Triumph, which is the perfect balance of handling, performance and usability,” said Triumph CEO, Nick Bloor.

What are your thoughts on an electric Thruxton or Bonneville? Admit there’s a certain appeal to the idea! We'll get to see what Triumph has in mind within the next two years, definitely a 0 to 100 kind of move. 

Sources: Motorcycle News, Moto Services