South Korean motorcycle manufacturer Hyosung has established a global presence, albeit a lackluster one when looked at in comparison to its fellow Sout Korean firms in the Automotive industry. Known mostly for its small displacement models targeted towards beginners, Hyosung trundles along the 2023 model year with a new model sold exclusively in the Chinese market for now. 

Based on the Aquilia 300, a cruiser sold in mutliple European markets, Hyosung has launched the GV 300 R Taming Wind, a cruiser that clearly represents bold styling decisions on the part of Hyosung, albeit ones that give the cruiser a rather ghastly appearance. Sure, Korean car manufacturers like Kia and Hyundai have been going all out with the wild angles, swooping lines, and radical lighting. For some folks, this look is futuristic, sporty, and even elegant.

The Hyosung GV 300 R Is An Odd Retro-Style Cruiser

Hyosung was probably hoping for the same result with the GV 300 R. That being said, our friends from German motorcycling publication Motorrad described it as "Fubar," a sentiment I tend to agree with, if I'm being honest. The GV 300 R's fuel tank is short and stubby, yet comes in a teardrop shape. It's then flanked on either end with air scoops which are more likely than not ornamental rather than functional. The front fender features an odd shape, with the sides extending over the brake calipers, making them look like air ducts to cool the brakes. To top it all off, the headlight is sharp and angular, and the exhaust is just weird. 

The Hyosung GV 300 R Is An Odd Retro-Style Cruiser
The Hyosung GV 300 R Is An Odd Retro-Style Cruiser

Underneath the GV 300 R Taming Wind's rather incoherent appearance, however, is a powertrain that's by no means new. It's rocking a small V-twin engine displacing 300 cubes and outputting 30 horsepower and 19 pound-feet of torque. Power is sent to the rear wheel via a drive belt, similar to cruisers from the likes of Harley and Indian. Underpinnings consist of an inverted front fork, and the rear end, similar in styling to a bobber, features a floating saddle with a monoshock housed beneath. A full-color TFT instrument pod rounds up the bike's features. 

At present, pricing for this peculiar cruiser has yet to be determined, but it's set to be sold exclusively in the Chinese market for now. There's no word just yet as to whether or not the bike will make its way to other markets where Hyosung is present in. 

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