Motorcycles are a language all their own.

2020 marked MV Agusta’s 75th anniversary. It’s one of those big milestones in anyone’s life, whether you’re a person or a motorcycle company—because it’s kind of a big deal. Still, if you’re reading this, you experienced all that 2020 had to offer—and you can probably say that it was a really strange year to have a major life event celebration.  

Still, despite everything the pandemic and global circumstances far outside its control threw at it, MV Agusta remained undaunted. In November, 2020, the company unveiled its special Superveloce 75 Anniversario edition. Only 75 would ever be made and sold for an exceedingly short time via MV’s website, and when they were gone, they’d be gone. To MV’s surprise and delight, all 75 sold out to eager fans in a matter of minutes.  

That brings us to June, 2021, and a special documentary film that MV Agusta worked on throughout 2020. Although it’s now technically MV’s 76th anniversary in 2021, the new movie You See a Bike deftly illustrates a company at a crossroads. Through a series of intimate interviews with eight different riders about their experiences with motorcycling in general, as well as MV in specific, we see a range of the passions that have driven MV from day one. You’ll want to turn on the subtitles to watch, but it’s well worth your time. From Thibaut Nogues to Carl Cox to Roland Sands to Giacomo Agostini, there are a lot of stories to appreciate here.

No rose-colored glasses or sepia-toned nostalgia here. This is also primarily not an MV history lesson, although talking to racers Virginio Ferrari and the legendary Giacomo Agostini does, by definition, bring some of that history to life. In some ways, the Superveloce is more than just an astonishingly beautiful piece of design for design’s sake. It’s also emblematic of a company looking in all directions at once: back at its past, all around at its present, and also at how it wants to see itself fitting into the future.  

As MV CEO Timur Sardarov has already discussed in recent interviews, that’s why MV in 2021 views itself as a mobility company. The company prides itself on passion, and on creating the kinds of experiences that make riders feel things more deeply. Thing is, it also envisions a world that includes considering what younger audiences want to ride, instead of trying to tell them what they should want to ride.  

That’s what the MV employees interviewed in this film feel makes the company stand out from the crowd, despite being a relatively small OEM in the grand scheme of things. How will this philosophy pan out? As always, it’s a work in progress, so we’ll have to keep watching to find out more. 

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