The Dayna is designed for rescue operations.

Electric motorcycles haven’t gained mass adoption yet, but they are growing in popularity. Though the range, charge times, and electrical infrastructure may not support leisurely riding, electric motos do well in specialized services. For instance, Blood Bikes Scotland just adopted a fleet of Zero SR/S bikes and the Cake Osa is perfect for food delivery.

Another great application is a mountain rescue bike, and students at Elisava at Barcelona’s University School of Design & Engineering recently designed an electric enduro using 3-D printing. Named Dayna, the project is the Elisava Racing Team’s (ERT) entry in the Barcelona Smart Moto Challenge. The contest calls on students around the world to develop the best electric motorcycle design. The Dayna marks the first all-electric, off-road bike designed for rescue operations at sporting events.

Gallery: Dayna: Electric Rescue Enduro

The project also utilizes 3D printing to create 19 panels of bodywork. The technology makes access to replacement plastics a cinch, as the ERT can replace damaged bodywork without relying on manufacturers or suppliers. Aside from quick replacements, 3D printing also helped the students develop the design of the Dayna in an accelerated manner. Rather than creating clay models or prototypes, the team could move from idea to reality with accelerated pace.

Utilizing a method called Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), ERT could test a variety of materials for its reinforcement qualities. For the fender, the students landed on a compound called PPGF GF30, a form of thermoplastic reinforced with glass fiber.

“Thanks to fiber-reinforced materials, in this case, carbon fiber, we were able to implement the pieces we wanted, with the versatility in the shape of the piece that FFF printing allows us to do,” said ERT project manager Jacobo Mateos.

Other than the innovative 3D printing development, Dayna also features proximity sensors, Bluetooth, and GPS. The systems will help monitor rescue efforts and send out communications for additional help. The ERT team hopes to commercialize the Dayna in the future. Of course, the medical rescue vehicle would have a large impact at sporting events but the 3D printing process it pioneered could also have lasting effects in the industry.

Gallery: Dayna: Electric Rescue Enduro

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