I'm not crying; you're crying.

There’s a lot of terrible stuff going on in the world at any given time, but this definitely isn’t one of those stories. Motovlogger iamsoulless has a younger brother named Nick who is mentally challenged. As he explained in this video, IAS came up with the great idea one day of putting a sidecar on his Honda Grom so he could take Nick for a ride in it—and now, Project Angel has been completed. This thing is fantastic—just watch the video and look at that smile on Nick’s face!

Nick is living life with multiple challenges, including the neurogenetic disorder Angelman Syndrome and autism, as IAS explained in this video. You can tell just by watching any of his channel that he loves his brother, and Nick is a great kid—but he gets to watch his brother out having fun on bikes all the time and will probably never be able to drive a car or ride a bike on his own.

Enter Industrial Moto. The custom builder takes on various projects—but one thing it specializes in is Grom sidecars. A notable feature of Nick’s combination of challenges is that he’s constantly reaching out to grab things. With that in mind, IAS and Tyler from Industrial Moto figured out that a special grab rail with restraints for Nick’s hands was one customization that would make the sidecar project absolutely perfect for Nick to ride in.

When IAS reached out to Industrial Moto about the build, Industrial Moto decided that if IAS could get the money together for parts, the company would waive the labor costs — as well as shipping costs to get the Grom from IAS’ home in Texas to the IM shop in Virginia. With the help of a GoFundMe, IAS and his followers (72.5k followers on Instagram and 18,585 on YouTube) raised enough money to make this dream a reality. According to Industrial Moto, the project took about two months to complete once he had the Grom in hand—but it looks like it was absolutely worth it. You can learn more about Project Angel and other Industrial Moto projects here.

Sources: YouTube, Industrial Moto, Angelman Syndrome Foundation