Listen, none of us are perfect. We may have chosen the perfect pastime (riding) and the perfect mode of transportation (motorcycles), but we are human. Some of us, for example, don’t keep a good eye on our tire pressures. If this describes you, a new smartphone app called PSIcle could eventually correct this bad habit. 

First off, please note that this app is currently only for bicycles, and it’s still in the Kickstarter phase. However, it's easy to see the possibilities for motorcycles, especially given the propensity of many riders to neglect tire pressures. While it should go without saying, low pressure affects your bike’s handling and tire life, and can be dangerous. 

psicle-1
It's not pretty, but it's clever.

The PSIcle works via a sensor you attach to your bike’s tire valve. Grab your phone, open the PSIcle app, and put your phone near the sensor. The tire’s PSI is then displayed prominently on-screen. Is it magic? Nope—it cleverly uses your phone’s barometer sensor to give a reading that’s accurate to within 0.06 psi. The standard version can read up to 50 psi, and  there’s also a high-pressure version for road cyclists/racers that can read up to 400 psi. 

Here’s the thing, though. The PSIcle only works on Presta valves, which are different from the Schrader valves most commoners have on their pedal bikes. PSIcle also clearly states in its FAQ section that this will not work on your ATV, ORV, car, etc., which also all use a Schrader valve. Boo-urns. 

2021 Yamaha YZF-R3 Monster Energy MotoGP Edition Rear Tire
The PSIcle won't check the pressures on your motorcycle tires yet.

The PSIcle Kickstarter campaign started on May 25, 2021, and in one month, 507 backers have raised almost $40,000—which is more than the company’s goal. This means the product will move forward. If it sees the light of day and finds success in the bicycle community, might the next logical step be motorized recreation and lightweight vehicles? Can you imagine the potential between scooters, motorcycles, off-road recreational vehicles and e-bikes? 

If nothing else, I hope this article at least inspires you to check your tires if you haven’t done so lately. Your bike will thank you for it! 

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