It's the 80s, Yamaha needed a bike to get into the AMA Superbike Championship. To qualify, the bike that needed to be fielded would have to be something special, and yet legal to ride on the street. 

It's a good thing that this 1987 FZR750RT came across my desk. Bring a Trailer holds a lot of interesting lots, and this is possibly a Yamaha collector's deal of the decade. 

Equipped with a carbureted 749cc inline four-cylinder engine with a six-speed manual transmission, the bike features red, white, and blue bodywork over an aluminum Deltabox chassis. You'll also find dual front brakes and a single disc in the rear. Because it is technically a race bike for the road, you get clip-on handlebars. 

Quad Mikuni carburetors supply fuel to the engine and the exhaust gases are forced out through a sweet Vance & Hines exhaust. Oddly the front wheel comes in at 17-inches in diameter, and the rear stands at 18 inches. 

1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

The seller acquired the bike in 2017, and after a partial repaint, rebuilt carburetor, refreshed suspension and brakes, and top-end engine overhaul, the bike is now listed on Bring a Trailer with a clean Ohio title in the seller's name. 

The lighting system is stock, along with the side stand, and fairing-mounted mirrors. According to the listing, the upper and lower fairings were repainted with replacement graphics put on. However, the seller did list some additions which include stainless steel front brake lines, a K&N air filter, rubber intake and airbox boots, fuel lines with a petcock, the aforementioned Vance & Hines muffler sleeve and packing, as well as clutch springs. The calipers have been overhauled along with the two master cylinders, and the rear brake rotor and linkage, and swingarm bearings have been replaced. As mentioned, the front and rear suspensions have been refreshed. 

1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

Just like bikes in the 80s, the Yamaha gets a fully analog display with a speedo that goes up to 160 miles per hour. The bike redlines at 11,500 RPM, and the miles on the clock show about 13,000 miles. The seller only contributed about 400 miles of the 13,000. 

The price of this lot isn't that bad either, but the auction ends in less than a day. The highest bid sits at $5,000 USD. If you're serious about collecting motorcycles, this is your chance to own something with historical relevance, but you have to act quickly. 

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