Does it really work, though?

What happens when construction is life, but motorcycles is lifer? Well, you get this funky contraption. Yes, that's a steel drum acting as the front wheel of that motorcycle. Yes, it's been designed as a makeshift road-roller. And no, I'm pretty sure it doesn't really work. So why would popular Indian vlogger, Crazy XYZ, do this experiment then? Well, maybe to prove that the sky's the limit as far as customizing your motorcycle in concerned. 

What'a particularly interesting is the great lengths the folks at Crazy XYZ went to just to create this utter monstrosity. As you can see, the entire front end of the bike has been binned. Sitting in its stead is a gigantic steel drum. The title of the video suggests that the bike is meant to be used as a road-roller, which is usually a gargantuan bit of kit that's meant to, well, roll roads. As such, it's funny to even think that this motorcycle road-roller thing is even slightly going to work.

Check Out This Wild Road-Roller Motorcycle

Of course, the gigantic steel drum will, in one way or another, flatten the surface on which you are riding. However, the skinny rear tire is sure to leave a nice straight line on your fresh asphalt, as you trundle along your road-rolling escapades. This was clearly shown towards the end of the video, wherein our hero tried to flatten a section of what appeared to be farmland with his nifty little contraption. The tiny little TVS Victor struggled to put the power down thanks to the drastically altered weight balance. When it did get moving, the rear wheel just destroyed all the ground flattened by the steel barrel, rendering the work useless.

There's no denying that such a wild custom contraption is about the furthest thing from street legal out there. For one thing, the bike certainly no longer behaves like a bike. Oh yeah, the front brake has also been removed, and I'm pretty sure the tiny little drum brake on that rear wheel isn't quite good enough to bring the bike safely to a stop. 

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