Bikes and Beards goes undercover to find out.

We all know that a new rider on a Kawasaki Ninja H2 is a recipe for disaster at best or even death at worst. Unfortunately, new riders sometimes don't understand this and crave the fastest bike they can get their hands on despite their inexperience. Bikes and Beards goes undercover to find dealers that sell a new rider what they want, rather than what they need, in the name of profit.

Shawn, who is very much not a new rider, pretends to be one as they check out a few dealers in Colorado, a state where wiretapping laws only require one party to consent to be recorded. It's also far from their home base in Pennsylvania, which significantly reduces the chance of them being recognized. Naturally, the first place they walk into recognizes Shawn instantly, because YouTube videos occasionally cross state lines. So much for undercover.

The plan works at the next two dealers, though. He tells the first salesman, Chris, that he wants to buy a Honda CBR1000RR. This is a great bike, but absolutely not for a new rider. He tries to point Shawn toward a 700 in a bit of subtle redirection. Shawn promptly ignores this, looking instead at a Honda VFR and some high-end sportbikes. The salesman plays along, showing him what he wants to see, but also advises him that these aren't good first bikes. Eventually, he comes right out and says he wouldn't recommend anything bigger than a 600 for a beginner, and patiently explains many reasons why.

At the next dealer, Dennis isn't subtle at all about what he thinks of this idea. He comes right out and says a 1000 supersport is the worst choice he can possibly make for a first bike. Dennis even says he wants to be Shawn's primary insurance beneficiary if he buys it. Still, he shows Shawn what he wants to see, while still trying to steer him away. He strongly suggests an MSF course, and tells him all kinds of things that can go wrong if he tries to ride a liter-bike with no experience.

Dennis is older, so just to play the part of the ignorant newbie to the hilt, Shawn gets a second opinion from Jesse, a younger salesman. Surely he'll understand, right? Jesse does but still tries to steer Shawn toward a smaller bike. He says he's been riding for 20 years and still rides 600s, which is a great way to knock down Shawn's bravado without insulting him. "I mean, you're a grown man, we'll sell you anything you want," says Jesse. "We just like to do our jobs, and that way if something was to happen, we have a clear conscience about it."

All of these salesmen did the right thing. Despite Shawn playing deliberately obtuse, they took their time with him and tried to teach him why a smaller bike is a better first bike. Ultimately their job is to sell the customer what they want, but when they're not making a smart or safe choice, they try to steer the customer in a different direction, even if it means a smaller commission for them on a less expensive beginner bike. To reward this, Shawn is sending each of them a pair of riding gloves and $500 cash. None of them expected a reward for doing the right thing, but they certainly earned it here.