Just 15 mph over the limit can cost you $900.

Earlier this week we reported on a modified e-scooter getting seized for going three times its speed limit in Norway. Clocked at just 36 mph, this seems a laughable and heavy-handed price to pay for going a little bit fast. Let me give you a little more perspective on just how seriously Norway takes speeding offenses.

Historically, Norway has taken a different attitude with speed than the rest of Europe. While most of the continent began its motoring with no limits at all, Norway imposed a 20 mph limit in rural areas and a 9 mph limit in cities all the way back in 1912. Over the years Norway has gradually raised these limits, to a general rule of 50 mph in the country and 30 mph in town, with exceptions for highways and such. That's still quite low for Europe (though relatively close to what I deal with in New Hampshire).

The limits are bad enough, but it's the fines that will get you. We're not talking about the old days of Montana issuing a $5 no points ticket for excessive pollution. For going just 5 km/h (3 mph) over the limit, you can be fined $85. That's within the margin of error of most speedometers. It only gets worse from there. If the limit is over 70 km/h (43 mph) and you get caught going 35 km/h (21 mph) over, expect to pay a $1,087 fine. Higher than that, you can get your license revoked on the spot and find yourself walking. The most hardcore speeders will find themselves in jail for at least 18 days.

With this in mind, we can predict what the speeding e-scooter operator is in for. Setting aside any additional fines for illegally modifying the scooter, we know that such vehicles are limited to 12.4 mph, and this one got caught going 36. Translated to kilometers, that's 58 km/h with a limit of 20, or 38 over the limit. That's a fine of $906, as well as a possible loss of license if the operator has one.

That's a hefty price to pay for hopping up a scooter to go 36 mph. We'd never recommend doing this, of course. There are much better ways to go fast. Not that we'd ever condone speeding, either.