As usual, it's all about loud pipes and excessive noise.

It seems that excessive noise from motorcycles is a problem worldwide. We've covered crackdown efforts in the UK, Germany, and here in the US. Now Malaysia is increasing its own enforcement efforts against loud pipes.

Inspector-General Tan Sri Abdul Hamid Bador told the press that Malaysian police will be conducting special operations against illegally modified motorcycles in the near future, reports iMotorbike. "Many people complained that these motorcyclists are causing disturbances, especially with their noisy exhausts," he said. "These same riders are also disrupting regular traffic when they travel in groups. Enough is enough for those who rev the engines of their modified motorcycles, especially in the mornings and disturb the peace."

While the Inspector General's statement indicates that the emphasis of enforcement will be on noise violations, his words are broad enough that they could include any modifications at all. Would a bike with a factory exhaust but an upgraded suspension be considered illegally modified? What about a bike that comes with a rather loud exhaust straight from the factory? Could a high-revving, completely stock sportbike be a target simply for being loud? This isn't clear from his statement.

What is clear is that police are quite serious about this issue. "Modified motorcycles may be seized, and they must be restored to their original condition," said the Inspector-General. How, exactly, the owner is supposed to restore their bike to its original condition while impounded is beyond me.

Not that it's needed, but this is even more proof that loud pipes don't save lives, but make life more difficult for all riders. Annoying the public to the point where law enforcement gets involved with a crackdown like this is bad for all of us. It makes us look bad, and makes all of us potential targets for enforcement of "illegal modifications," whether our bikes are actually modified outside the limits of the law or not. It hasn't gotten to this point in the US, fortunately. Hopefully, it never will.