Hopped a boat from Argentina to Antarctica, but everything else was a 51,000 kilometer ride.

Would you like to ride from the Arctic Circle to the Antarctic Circle? If so, what bike would you choose? Would you go by yourself, or with a trusty fellow moto adventurer or two? These are just three out of a slew of questions you’d have to ask yourself before setting out on such a journey, and that’s before you consider the practical matters of food, lodging, and of course, time off work.  

Seasoned motorcycle adventurer Deepak Kamath got two adventuring buddies and a number of Indian motorcycle industry sponsors on board to perform a most incredible feat. The trio of riders took their 400cc single Bajaj Dominars from Alaska to Usuaia, Argentina—and then to Antarctica—all in just 99 days, because hey, some of us can’t just take six months or a year or more off to go travel.  

“We are from India, and we have a very different access to resources than riders in the West. It’s incredibly tough to finance a journey like this on your own, and few Indians can simply take off and travel for years. So, for us, this was a simple compromise – do this journey in 99 days, or not at all, and we happily took the opportunity,” Kamath told ADV Pulse

 

Of course, that meant his co-riders had to be accepting of a hardcore, punishing schedule to cover many, many kilometers every single day. They had a strict schedule to adhere to for the sponsors, after all. Even with a bad crash in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada that grounded the team for about three weeks, they managed to complete their 51,000-kilometer (that’s nearly 31,690 miles, if you wondered) journey on time.  

The team chose not to travel with a chase vehicle, and performed what repairs and maintenance they could themselves as issues arose. In the case of the Vancouver crash, the team found help through a local motorcycle shop, and had parts express-shipped straight from Bajaj in India to get them back out on the road as soon as possible.  

At the end, though, Kamath did it—he rode in Antarctica. It took time, effort, and a whole lot of visa wrangling to make his dream come true—but he did it. Where are you riding today—and where are you planning to ride in the future? 

Sources: YouTube, Instagram, ADV Pulse