The countdown is on.

With Europe’s Euro 5 and India’s BS6 new emission standards dropping the ax on a motorcycle industry still reeling from the pandemic, bike makers are scrambling to put the final touch to their lineup updates to keep everyone happy and compliant.   

For BMW, a lot of the leg work was done over the past year or two and most of the lineup is now all up-to-date. This year, aside from the highly anticipated R 18, the manufacturer’s launch schedule has been pretty quiet but before 2021 rolls in, there at least one other unveiling that will take place: that of the updated 2021 G 310 R and GS.    

We already knew that BMW was planning to updates its duo of 310. Earlier this year, the test mule of a G 310 R was spotted on the road in Europe for the first time. There have since been several more sightings of the updated 310 twins, mostly in India.   

Gallery: Spy Shots BMW G 310 GS/R

While visually, the differences between the current models and the upcoming ones are minimal, to say the least, the more important changes likely happened on the inside. The 310 twins have yet to receive the necessary modifications to meet the Euro 5(and India’s BS6) emissions regulations which would make them illegal to sell new starting in 2021. It’s, therefore, safe to assume that the bikes in camo we spotted rocked a few much-needed engine updates to make them compliant.   

BMW India has now published the first teaser images the 2021 G 310 R and GS on its website that shows the two bikes clad in shadow with a spotlight cleverly directed at their contrasting red tubular frames.   

2021 G 310 R Teaser

Though BMW usually launches in Europe first before spreading to the other markets, this time, the 310 wave will originate from India. After all, the 310s are built by Indian giant TVS Motors so the decision to launch locally makes sense.  

We have yet to get an announcement for the European and North American markets. Considering the bikes were spotted testing in Europe as well and that they’re now meeting the BS6 standards—which are pretty much the same as Euro 5—we can assume they will come westward before the year is over.