They're mean-looking, to boot.

Looking to upgrade your braking performance? Galfer’s new Cubiq brake discs might be what you’re looking for, if they live up to the marketing hype. They’re bold-looking, but Galfer says the new components offer several practical advantages over standard brake discs, beyond the edgy visuals. The new discs are available in floating and fixed configurations, and they’re compatible with a wide variety of motorcycles.

The name comes from the crystalline structure of steel molecules, which sounds a bit silly—more likely, marketeers thought it sounded cool, and matched the discs’ aggressive design. Thankfully, there’s more to this than just a visual overhaul. Reading further through the press release, it seems there’s actual functionality behind the discs’ polygonal pattern. According to Galfer, the geometric design “enhances cooling and significantly reduces the weight, thus improving the maneuverability of the motorcycle.”

The perimeter of the disc is supposed to shed heat efficiently; Galfer says the design “optimizes the mass-heat dissipation ratio,” according to the company’s simulations. The skeletonized interior section allows Galfer to significantly lighten the brake disc without sacrificing performance. Galfer says the lighter discs mean less unspring mass, resulting in better agility and maneuverability. The new design also supposedly optimizes brake pad wear.

Galfer’s new Cubiq brake discs originally broke cover at the 2019 EICMA motorcycle show. No doubt the coronavirus pandemic slowed down production delivery, just like it’s affected the rest of the aftermarket. The Cubiq discs are supposed to fit most top-tier sport bikes currently available from Japan and Europe. They’re also supposedly compatible with Harley-Davidson, Indian, and Victory cruisers.

According to Galfer, the Cubiq discs will be available in Europe in fall, 2020. The floating version will have a 225 Euro MSRP, and the fixed disc will have a 115 Euro MSRP. That’s roughly $265 and $135, respectively. There’s no word yet on North American availability, but it seems unlikely for the 2020 riding season. For more information, see the Cubiq catalog here.

Source: Galfer