Sir, yes sir.

Royal Enfields are an important source of inspiration for custom builders around the world. It’s almost as though there’s a new Interceptor 650 or Continental GT-based custom unveiled every day. Earlier in 2020, Royal Enfield launched the “Custom World” web series to take a closer look at some of these builds.   

One of the latest projects featured in the web series is Royal Enfield Custom Crew’ MJR Roach, a cartoonish, post-apocalyptic parts bin special that resulted in a mean-looking—and sounding—Himalayan.   

MJR Roach Custom Royal Enfield Himalayan
MJR Roach Custom Royal Enfield Himalayan

The Royal Enfield Himalayan isn’t a bike built for performance. Far from it. The middleweight adventurer relies on a sturdy 411cc mill that’ll get you there, slowly and steadily. Sometimes, somebody, somewhere decides that slowly and steadily isn’t good enough and throws a turbocharger into the mix. That’s the little secret MJR Roach is hiding: a Garrett GT 125 that gives a boost of roughly 50 horsepower.   

To be fair, the MJR Roach build isn’t your average Himalayan with a turbocharger strapped to the engine. It’s your quintessential Frankenbike, built using an amalgam of salvaged bits and pieces the Royal Enfield Custom Crew had laying around the shop.   

They combined the rescued engine and chassis of two separate Himalayans and paired them up with a motocross-sourced inverted front fork using a Continental GT support structure. At the back, the team used the Himalayan’s stock spring but replaced the factory swingarm with a single-sided unit stretched by Harris Performance. The exhaust was rerouted so that the dual muffler sits high on the frame—perfect for when you need to make a run for it through a pond or a stream. 

MJR Roach Custom Royal Enfield Himalayan
MJR Roach Custom Royal Enfield Himalayan
MJR Roach Custom Royal Enfield Himalayan

The team opted for a video-game inspired military theme for its design which ultimately informed the bike’s look and livery. The round headlight was replaced by a four-light pod cluster. Two gauges were added below the Renthal Fatbar to display the pressure and air/fuel ratio. The stock fuel tank was painted to feature the name MJR Roach moniker on each side, complete with a cartoonish band-aid that suggests the bike got beaten up a little. It also changed and reupholstered the saddle then used parachute belts and buckles to strap both the seat and the fuel tank down.   

Ultimately, the Royal Enfield Custom Crew wanted to create a bike that would allow its rider to easily get away from hordes of zombies or mask-wearing villains out to get you. That’s mission accomplished if you ask us. At ease, now, Major.