No box, but it does fold up like one!

Honda’s handy, dandy little Motocompo was an innovation well ahead of its time. Briefly blipping into existence between 1981 and 1983, this little 50cc, hundred-pound, foldable, trunkable scooter is now a certifiable cult classic. Just around 54,000 of them were ever built. So you’d think that by now, they’d all have at least a few miles on them—wouldn’t you?

That’s apparently not the case, because Belgian motorbike shop TVP Classics is currently selling a red 1982 NOS Motocompo. All the information the company has listed on its website is contained in a single line: “Brand new NOS Honda NCZ50 Motocompo.” 

Gallery: 1982 Honda Motocompo

It’s unclear if this one comes with any documentation, but it does appear from some photos provided to Silodrome that it comes with the official Motocompo cover. Also, you should totally look at those photos anyway if you’d like to see an extremely adorable shop dog modeling the Motocompo for you. It’s not clear what the shipping costs would be for this adorable little scoot, but the bike’s cost on its own is just 7500 Euros (or US $8,313). 

Thinking about the current obsession with last-mile transportation solutions makes how far ahead of its time Honda was with the Motocompo even clearer. Was it a perfect solution? Of course not, but neither is anything else. I mean, 100 pounds is a pretty hefty thing to have to lift into and out of the back of your car at any given time. Also, despite how small it folds up, it could seriously hamper your carrying capacity in said car. 

Still, we doubt that city centers would face the sidewalk hazards of people leaving abandoned Motocompos strewn everywhere, as has been a recurring problem with e-scooters. Perhaps the problem with the Motocompo is that it tried to bring pit bike convenience to people who’d never otherwise touch the things—and they weren’t sure what to do with them. 

In any case, this looks to be a fine example if you want to add a Motocompo to your collection—pupper not included.

Sources: TVP Classics, Silodrome