A perfectly restored piece of motorcycling history.

Mecum Monterey 2019 is packed to the rafters with gems. Rarity is the name of the game, from a Lotus C-01 to a Matchless G45 Racer all the way to a 1937 Crocker Big Tank. For a certain type of bike enthusiast, it’s the dealership of your dreams, because you’d never find all these things under one roof anywhere else. 

It’s fitting, then, that Mecum Monterey 2019 is also where you’ll find this absolutely pristine 1912 Indian Twin Board Tracker. The bike has been fully restored by noted Indian Motorcycles restorer Jim Prosper, who regularly wins prizes in Antique Motorcycle Club of America events for how perfectly period-correct his painstaking restorations are. 

Gallery: 1912 Indian Board Tracker

In fact, this specific example earned an AMCA Junior 1st at the Yankee Chapter meet, as well as an AMCA Senior award, because Prosper leaves absolutely no square inch unperfected. He regularly sources original parts from everywhere he can find them to get every tiny bit just right, and is known for his heavy use of factory parts. 

When you love what you do enough to recreate a 1913 Indian dealership in your garage—like Prosper apparently did, according to Hemmings—this is just the kind of thing that happens. People who love classic Indian motorcycles appreciate Prosper’s attention to detail more than the rest of the world, but the rest of the world would likely stand in awe if they saw examples like this. The man has an undeniable talent for finding what he wants, including an authentic Indian wooden dealership sign for his garage that was still in its original packing crate—and it extends to original parts for his restorations, as well.

This 1912 61 CI Board Tracker features the Hedstrom Improved Carburetor, a Bosch magneto, Indian-stamped pedal cranks, as well as period-correct hand grips and pedals. It’s expected to fetch between $100,000 and $175,000 at this auction, but there’s also no reserve. It’s Lot F142, and crosses the block on Friday, August 16, 2019. 

Sources: Mecum, Silodrome, Hemmings