The new "Premium Brand Experience" will let you customize your order up to the last minute.

The old stickers proclaiming that "All parts falling off this motorcycle are of the finest British craftsmanship" haven't been true for some time, particularly as Triumph has continued to make bikes with classic looks and modern technology. Triumph continues to advance its technology behind the scenes as well, automating many services, inside and out, through the power of the Internet.

Triumph is making some major computer system upgrades that will enhance what it calls its "Premium Brand Experience." A massive customer relationship management system will connect all areas of the company, from dealers to factories, to the human resources department. The details of this system are rather boring if you aren't in the computer industry, so let's focus on the part we care about: ordering a new Triumph motorcycle.

Customers will have a great deal of control over the order from the beginning to the end of the process. They will be able to walk into a dealer, pick a motorcycle they like, and say "I want that one, but I want it in yellow instead of black." No problem, says Triumph, and the special order goes into the system.

From that point on, the customer will be able to track the progress of the order online, up to and including its promised delivery date. If they decide partway through they'd prefer British Racing Green to Screaming Yellow Zonker, they will be able to make that change online all the way up to the moment the bike is built. At that point, the customer will be able to actually watch the construction process of their particular bike through live streaming video. How cool would it be to watch your particular bike get built in real time?

Triumph wants to be a more upscale company, comparing itself to Ferrari, as a manufacturer of low production, high-quality vehicles. This online order and production tracking system certainly gives the company a leg up on the competition when it comes to customer service.

Source: Computer Weekly