While Triumph appears to be taking a "pass" on 2010, revealing only special editions of existing models instead of any genuinely new products, it's announced that seven new models are planned for release by the end of 2012. These new products should increase the diversity of John Bloor's products, currently arranged in three families -- Cruiser, Urban Sport and Modern Classic -- Triumph says it's...

While Triumph appears to be taking a "pass" on 2010, revealing only special editions of existing models instead of any genuinely new products, it's announced that seven new models are planned for release by the end of 2012. These new products should increase the diversity of John Bloor's products, currently arranged in three families -- Cruiser, Urban Sport and Modern Classic -- Triumph says it's adding four new ones. No word on what they are, but we're guessing there'll be some splitting up of the current families in addition to models in segments Triumph doesn't currently compete in.
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One of the most glaring omissions from Triumph's current range is a genuine adventure tourer, since the Tiger went all upright tourer in 2007, the company has lacked anything capable of tackling even a fire road. We also expect to see the Urban Sport range split, with full-on sportsbikes like the Triumph Daytona 675 being spun into their own range that's separate from more city-oriented bikes like the Triumph Speed Triple.

Triumph's in a relatively strong financial position in comparison to its Japanese rivals. Why it won't disclose overall sales numbers for 2009, it has said that it experienced a 5.49 percent sales increase in December when compared to the same year in 2008. Sure, that probably only adds up to 600 bikes across the entire country, but growth in a down market is a positive sign.

Triumph's success can be pegged to one thing: good products. Bikes like the Daytona resemble market archetypes closely enough that they're easily cross shopped with more established competitors, at which point they're revealed to offer something genuinely different over the can't-tell-them-apart Japanese bikes. The company is also able to cash in on its heritage with the Bonneville range while offering bikes that are genuinely contemporary in their performance, build quality and price. The company even sells the only cruiser I've ever genuinely enjoyed riding, the utterly epic Triumph Rocket III.

All this has us salivating at the prospect of all-new products. Seven new products in four new ranges? What could they be? Dirt bikes? Scooters? Dirt scooters?!