Both Unlike less sophisticated systems already on the market that rely on a lanyard between bike and rider to trigger release of an airbag, Dainese's setup and the similar Alpinestars TechAir instead rely on multiple sensors that detect acceleration in different planes at different areas on the riders' body. If the suit's computer determines that the data is sayin...

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Dainese's airbag and the two biggest crashes of 2010
Unlike less sophisticated systems already on the market that rely on a lanyard between bike and rider to trigger release of an airbag, Dainese's setup and the similar Alpinestars TechAir instead rely on multiple sensors that detect acceleration in different planes at different areas on the riders' body. If the suit's computer determines that the data is saying "crash" then it inflates the airbag. This is a far more desirable method than the lanyard as it eliminates the possibility for accidental airbag deployment, works even if the rider doesn't fully separate from the bike in a crash and deploys sooner during the accident to better protect the rider. As you can see, D-Air and TechAir both inflate to protect the shoulders, collarbone and neck; all uniquely vulnerable areas.