Plan on venturing into the great unknown on two wheels? Here's how to make a Motorcycle Survival Kit that fits on your bike without adding too much weight.

Break down in the middle of nowhere? Crash in the desert? Get stranded due to weather? Carrying a few basic essentials with you can make the difference between life and death. Here’s how to make a motorcycle survival kit.

For the purposes of this article, let’s assume you’ve already got things to fix your bike handled — tools, tire repair kits, bulbs, fuses, etc — and concentrate instead on human survival. The stuff you’ll need to get you home or to keep you alive while you await rescue.

As motorcyclists, we enter into this a little more prepared than the common man on the street, our clothing is already designed to protect us from extreme weather. A jacket designed to keep you warm in 85 mph wind chill will do just as well huddled around a campfire.

And that’s the quickest way to die in the outdoors — exposure. “The first, biggest killer out there is hypo or hyperthermia,” explains survival expert Cody Lundin. “Another non-negotiable is water. The easiest way to maintain that core temperature aside from clothing is water. Your circulatory system is responsible for heating and cooling the body and to do that your body must stay hydrated.”

So let’s start the survival kit there as the most important item and work our way down to the least.

Klean Kanteen

Klean Kanteen

Water Bottle

Or a hydration pack or whatever works for you. You’re likely taking water with you riding already, but it’s always a good idea to make sure you have a little extra. Throw a Klean Kanteen in your tail pack or fill your Kriega Hydro-3 to full, even if you’re only off for an afternoon ride. A little extra weight and volume won’t kill you, but a lack of water will. An unlined aluminum or steel water bottle is rugged and will allow you to heat water over a fire to purify it or cook food.

tincture of Iodine, 2%

tincture of Iodine, 2%

Iodine

The easiest, cheapest, smallest and most effective way to make found water suitable for drinking is plain ol’ Tincture of Iodine 2%. Put two drops in your standard water bottle, shake it up, wait 15 minutes and you’re good to go. Those two drops aren’t enough to make the water taste bad and don’t stress if you spill a little extra in there. Don’t be pregnant, have an Iodine allergy or have thyroid gland problems though. You can’t carry unlimited water on your bike, but carrying this tiny little bottle of Iodine can allow you to make as much safe drinking water as you’ll ever need.

Tyvek Jacket

Tyvek Jacket

Tyvek Jacket

In the mountains when the weather suddenly takes a turn for the worse? Whether you just need to make it down or are forced to spend the night, you’ll need to get warm. The same material that insulates your home makes a killer waterproof, windproof, breathable layer that packs incredibly small and can be very cheap to buy. If you’re unprepared for precipitation, one of these worn over your motorcycle gear will keep you dry. Or, it will work well as an insinuative layer too.

Silk glove liners

Silk glove liners

Silk Glove Liners

“If you can’t hold on to the handlebars because you have frost bite on your fingers, you’re DOA,” says Cody. Silk glove liners are effective, affordable and will fit under pretty much any gloves.

Silk Balaclava

Silk Balaclava

Silk Balaclava

“By putting on a hat and some sort of neck covering, it’s minimally equivalent to putting on a light sweater,” explains Cody. “The good thing about this is the head and the neck are easy places to cover for limited space. A balaclava will be worth its weight in gold for a motorcycle survival kit.” Silk offers excellent insulation for its thickness while being luxuriously comfortable and durable.

First Aid Kit

First Aid Kit

First Aid Kit

You can stop most bleeding with the clothing you wear or just man up and deal with the pain of any injury that doesn’t stop you from moving, but adding a first aid kit will give you the ability to clean wounds or deal with problems like diarrhea or allergic reactions (mainline Benadryl in case of snake bite). To make mine, I started with this Adventure Medical Kits Sportsman and added stuff like Ace Bandages, a SAM Splint, a snake bite pump and prescription medicine to create something pretty comprehensive.

Protein Bars

Protein Bars

Protein Bars

On the list of survival priorities, food comes dead last; it takes two weeks to a month to starve to death. But, putting some calories in your body can give you calories to burn for warmth and is a huge psychological boost. Don’t let them take up too much space, but a couple protein bars are well worth packing.

Read More, Page Two >>

Related Links:

More From Cody: Cody Lundin On Surviving By Riding

Get Out There: How To Go Motorcycle Camping On A Budget

Stay Warm: How To Layer For Warmth

Esee Fire Starter

Esee Fire Starter

Fire Starter

Fire will keep you warm, dry you out and give you the ability to purify water, signal for help or even cook food (we suggest plump riding buddies, they’re easiest to catch). Lighters don’t work in the cold and can break or leak. Matches don’t work well in the rain or high winds. Instead, I carry an Esee Fire Starter with two Vaseline-soaked cotton balls carried in the handle to use as tinder. That will never break, works in any weather condition and lasts virtually forever. The cotton balls are cheap and easy to make; pull them apart to expose the dry interior, hit that with a spark and you get a reliable two minutes of four-inch-high flame to work with.

Esee Izula

Esee Izula

Small Knife

Knives have a million uses in a survival environment, most importantly allowing you to access the dry interior of dead wood, even when everything around you is soaked. I carry an Esee Izula. It’s a little pricey, but because it’s a thick fixed-blade, it’ll never, ever break, can be used to split small logs or perform other difficult tasks that would be impossible with a folding knife.

Gorilla Tape

Gorilla Tape

Duct Tape

Wrap this around your water bottle or an old credit card to save space. Use it to seal vents in helmets, repair torn riding gear, fasten broken boots or, paired with a stick or two, fashion an effective splint for a broken bone. It also comes in handy for making shelters, starting fires, covering blisters or attaching bandages to difficult areas of the body.

Superglue

Superglue

Super Glue

Got a deep cut or flap of sliced-off skin? Clean it, add something that will kill bacteria like Neosporin, then pinch it closed and apply super glue generously across the opening. Add it to your first aid kit or just throw a tube under your seat. Incredibly useful in a variety of situations. Note: If the wound gets hot, red or itchy you may have an encapsulated infection and it will need the attention of a doctor as soon as you are back in civilization. Clean the wound well prior to closure to avoid this.

Cable Ties

Cable Ties

Cable Ties

Like duct tape, these can be used to repair damaged riding gear. They’re particularly useful if you have a broken backpack strap. They can also come in handy for shelters and splints and you’re likely already carrying them to repair a damaged bike.

Spot Messenger 3

Spot Messenger 3

Spot Messenger 3

SHTF? Pushing the panic button on one of these will call in the cavalry, no matter where you are in the world. They work via GPS, so as long as you can see the sky, you can call for help.

And how will you carry all this crap on your bike? Believe it or not, but all this and more will fit into a Kreiga US-5, which you can securely strap anywhere on your bike or even to the outside of a backpack.

Did we miss anything? Has a survival kit saved your life? Tell us about it in the comments below.

Related Links:

More From Cody: Cody Lundin On Surviving By Riding

Get Out There: How To Go Motorcycle Camping On A Budget

Stay Warm: How To Layer For Warmth